December 11, 2018 – “Staff Party”

Hello, everyone!

Before reviewing the events at the archives, a major development occurred on campus. Today marks the day of the official dismantling of Colbourn Hall, once the home for the College of Arts and Humanities. I remember the final day of my Summer Class and I announced to everyone present that this was the last class for any of us in that building. I took pictures of the occasion and observed the hallways I once roamed were now ripped bare for the world to see. Colbourn Hall’s demise juxtaposed the rest of today’s light-hearted events.

As noted from the previous entry, I helped prepare for the library staff’s end of the year party. The food was prepared today and everyone from the library’s various departments joined together at the third-floor staff lounge to partake in the delectable morsels. Turkey (white and dark meat), ham, candied bacon with small hot dogs, mashed potatoes, broccoli with cheese, French onion green bean casserole, chips with buffalo chicken dip, salads, vegetarian specialties, crackers and cheese, and cornbread were just some of the featured meals. After ingesting two platefuls of such great food, I joined most of my colleagues and went down to Room 203.

Room 203 featured desserts such as chocolate chip cookies (with the questionable topping of sea salt), cupcakes, eclairs, and velvet cake among others. For a good period of time, I spoke with Joe Kaminsky, Courtney Toelle, May Tang, and Elisabeth (one of our new volunteers) at our small table. Eventually, our fellowship ended and we returned to our offices. Of course, this did not last as Ms. Rubin requested all of us to help clean up Room 203 (take down the decorations, set the chairs and tables back to their normal positions, etc.).

As for actual archival work, I slowly progressed through the tightly packed film strip sleeves in one of the binders of the Michael Berman Collection. At one point, the number of strips seemed to double and greatly baffled me in wondering how did anyone pack so many strips into one sleeve.  I took a small break from that binder to exam the next one.

Thankfully, only two sleeve pages needed to be examined. After finishing that binder quickly, I returned to grinding through the previous binder. Much to great elation, I eventually finished that nightmare of a binder. The only binder left was one filled with slides and I breezed through it much faster than the binders containing film strips. There was even time to show everyone a slide featuring a Kermit the Frog puppet stuffed into one of the cannons at the Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine from 1995 (something that is strongly advised not to do).

Once finished, I packed everything up and returned the cart to the back of the Special Collections shelves (the “stacks,” as the archival staff calls it). Not too long after, the library intercom announced the library would close in thirty minutes. Apparently, the library closes at 5:00 PM in the short period before the Winter Break. When the time eventually came, I bid farewell to the staff and departed for the day.

In review, I enjoyed myself at the end of the year party and completed my analysis of the Michael Berman Collection. Tomorrow, I will have to speak with Mr. Ogreten about my next assignment. Until then, enjoy the evening and stay safe! Bye!

 

Author: 57r3l574d

I am currently a Graduate Student at the University of Central Florida and simultaneously employed by the university library's Special Collections and University Archives as a Other Personnel Service (OPS) Student. Expected to graduate in 2019 with a History MA - Public History Track.

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